Category Archives: Art and Politics Now

  1. Art and Bombs

    August 6 a day to commemorate the most horrifying act of all time, the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. I am giving you the work of several artists who address these acts from contrasting perspectives as a response to the horrifying comments coming from the President and perhaps for more work to be created on this subject.

  2. Zhi LIN: In Search of the Lost History of Chinese Migrants and the Transcontinental Railroads

    “Zhi LIN In Search of the Lost History of Chinese Migrants and the Transcontinental Railroads” at the Tacoma Art Museum is a tour de force of research, aesthetics, history, tragedy, and beauty.

  3. The Artnauts: A Global Collective of Artists for Peace

    The Artnauts, an art collective, travel to places of conflict and collaborate with artists in places such as Palestine, Guatemala, Bosnia, the Amazon, even China.

  4. Constellations (Asterismos) on Amorgos in the Cyclades

    Constellations, (Asterismos) a multimedia arts festival on the remote Cycladic Island of Amorgos is run entirely by volunteers with creative performers donating their time. Now in its fourth year, it gets better every year.

  5. Mona Hatoum at the Tate Modern

    Mona Hatoum overtly expresses violence in her early performance works, then through metaphor with minimal materials she brings that sense of threat into our own bodies and lives.

  6. Break Free From Fossil Fuels Pacific Northwest Anacortes

    Break Free From Fossil Fuels Pacific Northwest a coming together of more than a thousand people, on land and sea, to insist on working together to end the plundering the earth.

  7. Walid Raad Scratching on Things I Could Disavow

    Walid Raad Scratching on Things I Disavow at the Museum of Modern Art probes the interconnections of art, money, history, in the Middle East, focusing on Saadiyat (Happiness) Island in Dubai.

  8. The Museum of Modern Art and the Art of Disruption

    Museum of Modern Art disrupts our expectations in one exhibition after another, engaging political art, reinterpreting historical modernists and surprising us with irreverence.

  9. “¡Presente!: The Young Lords in New York”

    El Presente at El Museo del Barrio features the Young Lords of 1969-71, their activism and their art, a wonderful piece of history.

  10. “Not Vanishing: Contemporary Expressions in Indigenous Art, 1977 – 2015”

    “Not Vanishing: Contemporary Native American Art, 1977 – 2015” features 78 works of art by 49 artists from 23 tribes in the Northwest. In all media, and combining aesthetics, politics, history and urgent contemporary issues, this show at the Museum of Northwest Art in La Conner, Washington, is not to be missed. It closes on January 3.

  11. Nato Thompson Seeing Power, Art and Activism in the 21st Century

    My Review of Nato Thompson’s Seeing Power, Art and Activism in the 21st Century. Thompson is curator of Creative Time.

  12. QUIET INSIGHTS INTO STRUGGLE AND JOY AWAIT YOU AT THE WING

    the subtle and beautiful exhibition “Constructs” at the Wing Luke Museum features interactive installations by Asian Pacific Women Artists ranging from a canvas house to calligraphy carried into the landscapes of Seattle. Each installation is both personal and universal in their implications.

  13. “Migration” the exhibition until July 5

    Migration the Exhibition in Columbia City Guest Gallery until July 7 includes art about detention, migration, femicide, and much more by Deborah Faye Lawrence, Tatiana Garmendia, and Cecilia Alvarez

  14. Led by Indigenous voices, all ages protest Arctic Drilling

    From Indigenous poets to Raging Grannies, from children and youth to college students, to people of every age, everyone is participating in the protest of Shell’s Polar Pioneer oil drilling platform with creative non violent civil disobedience at its best

  15. “Permanent War: The Age of Global Conflict”

    “Permanent War: The Age of Global Conflict” presents the repeated destruction and instant death enabled by contemporary technology

  16. Rodrigo Valenzuela, the 13th man and the end of Utopia

    Rodrigo Valenzuela juxtaposes the words and experiences of migrants and other workers in the midst of the collapse of the utopian discourses of modernism and its structures, both philosophical and physical. He jarringly disconnects words and images to reveal the deep fissures in our society.

  17. City Dwellers: Contemporary Art from India at the Seattle Art Museum

    Past and present in India mix in the stunning exhibition “City Dwellers: Contemporary Art from India” It includes artists working in urban centers throughout the country. Until December 7 it is paired with a fascinating, small show at the Asian Art Museum of Mughal art and artifacts.

  18. The Common SENSE: Ann Hamilton at the Henry Art Gallery

    Ann Hamilton’s “The Common SENSE” at the Henry Art Gallery embraces our relationship to the planet in a surprisingly disturbing sequence of installations.

  19. Art in Seattle from my monthly Leschi column: “Modernism in the Pacific Northwest” and ” La Toya Ruby Frazier: Born by a River,”

    Modernism in the Pacific Northwest: the Mythic and the Mystical and La Toya Ruby Frazier: Born by a River, two exhibitions at the Seattle Art Museum in the last six months.

  20. The Tate Modern “A Chronicle of Interventions” Spring 2014

    Tate Modern London”A Chronicle of Interventions” includes Group Material 1984 Timeline A Chronicle of US Intervention in Central and Latin America.” Other more recent artists from Central America also address colonialism, but with much less passion.

  21. Syria Speaks: Art and Culture from the Frontline

    Syria Speaks is a profoundly moving new book published by English Pen with a collection of essays, art, and analysis of culture in Syria since the uprising began in 2011.

  22. Feminism and Performance: Joan Jonas and Gina Pane

    Parellel Practices: Joan Jonas and Gina Pane at the Henry Art Gallery. The two artists have different roots, philosophies and trajectories.

  23. Carletta Carrington Wilson “Unchain My Heart”

      At the outset of her poetic presentation, Carletta Carrington Wilson declared that her exhibition “Unchain My Heart” (listen!) is a testament to mystery. Her exhibition at Art Xchange Gallery included selections from three series of works, “constellation of shadows and leaves” (2006) “Orange You Mingus” (2008-9), and “book of the bound” (2011-12). The artist explained […]